10 Signs that SRI Investing is Hitting a Tipping Point

  1. US Trust study finds 85% of millennials want to invest with purpose.

  2. The US Sustainable Investment Forum reports 33% growth in SRI strategies in two years’ time from 2014 to 2016.

  3. The same report suggests that SRI filters apply to just under 20% of US equity assets, but there’s good reason to believe that we’re still in the early innings of this ballgame. For comparison, Bank of America Merrill Lynch report suggests that in Europe, SRI allocations are closer to 60%.

  4. GA Institute reports that the percent of S&P 500 companies publishing a sustainability report has gone from 20% to 82% between 2011 and 2016.

  5. Impact Investing is the “top trend” in philanthropy for 2015 and 2016.

  6. The Ford Foundation committed $1 billion to mission-related investments.

  7. Japan’s Government Investment Fund recently allocated 1 trillion yen ($8.9 billion) to socially responsible investments. Ho-hum say the Norwegians, the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund instituted their ethical guidelines in 2004.

  8. America’s largest asset owners, including Blackrock and even sleepy Vanguard, are stepping up their commitments to shareholder advocacy on ESG issues.

  9. The Department of Labor now has clear guidance that ESG can and should be considered in employer sponsored retirement plans.

  10. The Pope is now talking about impact investing.

The Most Misunderstood Song About The Power of Money

“For The Love Of Money,” may be the most misunderstood song in all of history. Focusing on the catchy “Money, Money, Money, Muuun-nay” refrain leads many to miss all the embedded soulful consciousness. A deeper dive sheds light on why the tune was chosen as the SRI Investor’s theme song.

For The Love Of Money” (lyrics listed below) is a warning composed by R&B artists who were rapidly approaching the pinnacle of commercial music success. This song was written and produced by the famous Philadelphia Soul collaborators Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff who also authored “If You Don’t Know Me by Now”, “Love Train” and scores of other famous R&B hits that have achieved immortality as groovy wedding ceremony staples. Gamble and Huff added Anthony Jackson as a writer of the song in recognition of the soul-piercing opening bass lines he developed which became a signature of the song.

“For The Love Of Money” was recorded by the O’Jays and became an immediate Billboard Hit in 1973. Instead of celebrating wealth, this unusually lengthy seven minute soul ballad offers seven examples of how greed entices people to do all kinds of terrible things to others and sometimes to themselves.

More wealth has been created in America in the last fifty years than in any country at any other period of history. Like Gamble and Huff, American capitalism is reaching the pinnacle of its economic success. This song reminds us that we can gain the whole world and yet still lose our soul.

The fundamental principle of the SRI Investor is this: the future is a product of the investment seeds we plant today. As investors, we hand our capital over to corporate managers for planting. They choose the seeds, the ground and the field workers. The one expectation that is absolutely certain is that their seeds are expected to produce a financial harvest. Yet, these seeds also represent a future of non-financial outcomes that impact key stakeholders.

Consider how tempting it can be to lose sight of these so called intangibles when the only question that most investors are asking is how well the stock did last quarter. It’s too easy to blame corporate America for losing their souls. Investors need to accept responsibility for the messaging they send to the planters.

“For The Love Of Money” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame Class of 2016. Just as Philadelphia Soul established its place in our culture perhaps there is some room for it in our portfolios as well.

Listen to “For The Love Of Money” recording on YouTube.

Lyrics:
Money, money, money, money, money [6x]
Some people got to have it
Some people really need it
Listen to me y’all, do things
Do things, do bad things with it
You wanna do things, do things
Do things, good things with it
Talk about cash money, money
Talk about cash money
Dollar bills, all

For the love of money
People will steal from their mother
For the love of money
People will rob their own brother
For the love of money
People can’t even walk the street
Because they never know
Who in the world they’re gonna beat
For that lean, mean, mean green
Almighty dollar, money

For the love of money
People will lie, Lord, they will cheat
For the love of money
People don’t care who they hurt or beat
For the love of money
A woman will sell her precious body
For a small piece of paper
It carries a lot of weight
Call it lean, mean, mean green

Almighty dollar

I know money is the root of all evil
Do funny things to some people
Give me a nickel, brother can you spare a dime
Money can drive some people out of their minds

Got to have it, I really need it
How many things have I heard you say
Some people really need it
How many things have I heard you say
Got to have it, I really need it
How many things have I heard you say
Lay down, lay down, a woman will lay down
For the love of money
All for the love of money
Don’t let, don’t let, don’t let money rule you
For the love of money
Money can change people sometimes

The Principles of SRI Investing

S – Sustainable: The sustainable investor seeks a flourishing future. While earning profits, they hold an unwavering commitment to stewardship of the planet and the inherent dignity of all people.

R – Responsible: The responsible investor acknowledges that increasing wealth requires purposeful oversight to ensure that personal and communal values are preserved.

I – Impact: The impact investor invests capital to solve clearly defined social and environmental problems and is willing when necessary to sacrifice financial returns to achieve these goals.

The Examined Life Assesses All Three Forms of Capital

Capital is often narrowly defined as a tangible financial resource. Yet even accountants understand that intangibles have value. In fact, adding together the intangibles alone on Google’s financial statements totals over $19 billion. These brands, patents, and goodwill are harder to measure, but no less important and valuable.

Individuals also carry intangible capital on their own “balance sheets.” Taking stock of your intangible capital is an essential aspect of the examined life.personal-capital-triangle

Much has been written about material capital, so I feel little need to offer anything but a very brief summary. This category includes your house, your savings, your cars, and anything else that fits in your jewelry box, garage, or investment account.

The next two forms of capital are the more intangible types:

Human capital is the category of your educational degrees, expertise, and personal health. Unlike financial investments that require faith in the management and expertise of others, you are the primary agent in this fundamental form of intangible capital. Is your training or physical or mental health keeping your from reaching your potential? If so, there’s no time like the present to start making changes to improve.

Social capital (also known as cloud capital) is the hardest to measure, but still important. Social capital concerns the relational and spiritual connections that provide meaning and value in life and beyond. I have yet to talk with someone nearing the end of their life who felt that they spent too much time with friends and family.

Relationships are a highly transferable part of social capital. Consider how often you were helped or hindered because of your family, associations, and references. Some inherit a large starting social capital balance, while others may be disadvantaged by race, gender, sexual identity, and/or other characteristics that separate one from the norms set by culture. Before you can begin to set social capital goals, you’ll need to begin with an pragmatic assessment.

If you identify anxiety, depression, stress or burnout, your primary goals may be focused on retreat, exercise, and reflection. An examined life requires time for self-reflection. Bill Gates takes two one-week “think weeks” every year, and a personal mentor of mine recommends at least one 24-hour silent retreat per year.

When financial advisors dare to guide discussions into the more intangible forms of capital, we call this life planning. Whether you do your life planning with your money guy, a trusted friend, or alone on a mountaintop, the point is that analysis and goal setting take time and intentionality.

You can begin taking stock of these three forms of capital by asking yourself the following question: How do I feel about each of my current balances?

Material capital: Good Shape, Needs Work, or Bankrupt?

Human capital: Good Shape, Needs Work, or Bankrupt?

Social capital: Good Shape, Needs Work, or Bankrupt?

There is wisdom in assessing all three forms of personal capital at the same time because they all impact each other. This is why the arrows of the personal capital triangle (see image above) point in two directions. Too often, only one aspect of capital development is assessed at a time—if ever. Failure to consider the big picture might lead your financial advisor to make one assessment and your clinical psychologist, quite another.

Viewing your material capital in isolation from your human and social capital has also fostered an unnatural ethical tension. Material gain earned by any legal means necessary may be creating debits to your human and social capital balances. The examined life considers all three forms of capital when reflecting and setting goals.

Author’s Note: Before creating this post, I started with a conversation among friends and I want to thank everyone who shared comments (both online and in person) which all helped shape my thinking on this subject.

Don’t Go At It Alone

A lack of affordable SRI investing solutions may incentivize some savvy investors to do their own research and purchase their own portfolio of individual stocks, but this is almost always a mistake.

If you’re joining the SRI movement, it’s likely because you have a vision for our world and the economy that’s bigger than your own portfolio. To leverage the full scope of impact, you should identify ways that you can coordinate your efforts with others whose values overlap with your own. The easiest way to do this is by purchasing a SRI fund, but there are other ways to maximize your impact.

Going it alone makes it extremely difficult to keep pace with the changing landscape of SRI investing. Volkswagen, for example, was once a darling of sustainable investors—then we found out they were rigging the emissions tests. Other companies are making radical improvements and are becoming worthy of SRI attention. The field is quite dynamic and you or your investment manager will need support to stay on top of latest developments.

You also need to consider how you plan to manage shareholder responsibilities. When I was a younger and more naive investment advisor, I argued that investors should begin attending shareholder meetings and voting proxies. Both tools were given to owners to exercise their stewardship oversight and I now realize that both are a big waste of time for most investors (the Berkshire Hathaway meeting excluded).

Every year, investors are asked to vote on a whole host of issues. Perhaps a company seeks to repurchase shares of its own stock. Or it plans a merger. Companies hire and fire new directors. These actions typically require a shareholder vote.

The problem is that most shareholders own a tiny fraction of total shares and this makes the uncoordinated actions of any one shareholder meaningless. The unspoken message at most shareholder meetings is essentially, “We’re only doing this because we’re required to.”

Naturally, most mainstream investors who own stocks ignore requests to vote or attend annual shareholder meetings. I no longer blame them! Exercising ownership powers are only fruitful when made in coordination with an ownership block large enough to be recognized.

To overcome these hurdles, you may want to identify a fee-only (no commissions) investment advisor who specializes in SRI investing—even better, find one who avoids the plethora of expensive SRI funds. An investment manager can identify investments that match your values and help manage all of your voting responsibilities.

Coordinated action can also take place by purchasing a mutual fund or ETF but the challenge here is that most funds have a poor track record of shareholder advocacy on governance issues as cited here and here. Investments that do have a strong track record for shareholder advocacy often have management fees that exceed a reasonable threshold.

To overcome these challenges, some decide to self-manage a stock portfolio. If you go this route, I recommend that you start by reading James McRitchie’s Shareowner Action Handbook, where he walks investors through the ins and outs of exercising shareholder powers. James is a personal hero and is one of a small group of individuals who regularly file their own shareholder resolutions to encourage corporate best practices.

You will also want to check out the work being done at Proxy Democracy, where you can see how leading investors including public pensions (e.g., CalPERS) and SRI fund company leaders (e.g., Calvert and TIAA CREF) voted their shares.

A natural corollary to this collaboration principle is a willingness to compromise. The two go hand in hand. The quality and quantity of research in the developing field of SRI investing has many gaps that offer plenty of room for disagreement on how best to rank or classify a given company. The deeper you decide to dive into the world of SRI, the more willingness you’ll need to live in “the gray”—that is, between simple black and white solutions.

However you decide to engage, let me be the first to warn you that the SRI community is unlike any other investment community that I’ve ever been a part of. There’s a more even distribution of men and women in leadership roles in this community and this gender balance brings with it a greater sense of collaboration. One leader in the field argued that it’s going to take billions and even trillions of dollars committed to sustainable investing before the capital markets will begin to take this new approach seriously. To get there, we all need to find more avenues to work together.

Note: Featured Image on this post was used under Flickr Creative Commons.